Tag Archive: Readiness


How To Survive The Coming Chaos: Hope For The Best, But Prepare For The Worst

 

 

 

 

” I have long dabbled in the preparedness mindset but never really paid too much attention to it all until my town was hit hard by a mile-wide, category-three tornado that destroyed or severely damaged hundreds of homes in my immediate area. Ordered to evacuate my home for several days the realization that things can change very quickly and that ‘bad things’ can and do happen to otherwise completely normal people has compelled me to re-evaluate my own preparedness for a wide variety of possible scenarios.

  One cannot be hurt by being prepared for whatever may happen, but one will undoubtedly be hurt if one has not prepared for the unexpected. That has become my mindset and how I now approach the concept of preparedness. It just makes good sense to have plans and preparations in place for the unknown. It is every man’s duty to provide and protect his family no matter what happens and being prepared is the ultimate fulfillment of that duty as well as being a valuable insurance policy against a great many possible threats.

  Ideally, one should plan to hunker down and not leave your own home unless you absolutely have to. This is ‘bugging in.’ Planning around this allows you to stock large stockpiles of water, food, and other supplies without any major convenience. Know your neighbors well, and this will allow you to have a small base of supplies and a network of people in the immediate vicinity that can help each other out if things go south quickly for whatever reason. Be a good neighbor now and they’ll be an invaluable neighbor then. I live in a cul-de-sac and know everyone on the block fairly well. I bring them gifts of garden produce in the summers, wave at them when I drive by, and invite them all over when I have my big backyard birthday bashes. We have helped each other out at various times and I would feel comfortable turning to them for assistance or access to tools etc. if I had no choice. Such nominal relationships could come in very handy some day. You never know.

  Let’s examine each of the subjects of preparation I have mentioned: “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loss Leader

 

 

 

” I’m glad to see a concerned senior Army officer respond to my recent piece on the risks of brain drain inside the U.S. military. Lt. Gen. Ben Hodges undoubtedly speaks for many senior leaders in each service who feel exactly the same way about this looming challenge: “Hey, we don’t even have a problem!”

Maybe, maybe not. Frankly, I remain worried. The issue is not that the best and brightest in the military have already left. My concern is that the worst effects of the ongoing drawdown are still to come — and may well be years away. The people who must ultimately judge whether Hodges’s defense is sound are the junior officers and sergeants wrestling with tough individual decisions about staying in or leaving the service. But for the Army, now is the time to look for leading indicators and craft proactive strategies to avert what could easily become one of the worst unintended consequences of shrinking the force.

Each service will have unique challenges keeping top-drawer talent as numbers drop, budgets tighten, and opportunities to serve in combat dwindle. But the Army most of all faces a perfect storm of vexing issues. It is gradually coming down from a wartime high of nearly 570,000 troops, planning to hit 490,000 by 2017. Most Army leaders and defense analysts expect that number will decline farther — perhaps to 400,000 soldiers or less. Officer and NCO reductions — voluntary and otherwise — under that scenario could number in the tens of thousands.

At the same time it gets smaller, the Army is leaving a decade of combat that has energized the force with an unparalleled focus and sense of mission. The next Army will largely be a garrison force based almost entirely in the United States, with limited opportunities to serve abroad. Even its planned exercise program to rotate units regularly overseas is jeopardized by lack of funding. Convincing experienced combat leaders that this force will be an empowering, exciting place to serve is the ultimate challenge. The bare bones remedies Hodges outlines are not nearly adequate to the task. Fundamental change is needed. Here are a few ways to do it: “