Tag Archive: Search & Rescue


Join Us For International Drone Day

 

 

Flyer

 

 

 

” Drones have a bad reputation, and even though many of us call our Multi-rotors by different names, the public does associate our fantastic machines with the word drone.   We are here to make sure that Drones are seen in a positive light.  International Drone Day is held every year on the second Saturday in the Month of March. This year is will be held on March 14, 2015

  What is International Drone Day?”

” The purpose of International Drone Day is to show the world that drones are good, and can be used for many good purposes. Movie making, search and rescue, police work, architecture, inspections, emergency response, and for just having fun.

  Groups of drone enthusiast get together into organized groups all across the world to fly their drones, and invite friends, neighbors, and the media to showcase drones in a good way

  The goal is to get as many Newspapers, blogs, TV News, Magazines, and groups to see drones being used for good.

  How do I participate in International Drone Day?

  We have groups that meet up all across the world, simply find a group in your area and sign up (its all free). Or if there is not a group, you can form a group or you can go out on your own and fly this day. Click here to become a captain or form your own group in your area

  A documentary film is being made on this historic event. So its a great time to be interviewed, and showcase your work or your companies work in a big media day, its time to be apart of something big Join here

  How do I show my participation in International Drone Day?

  You simply take a picture or video on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram with the tag #InterntationalDroneDay
And you let the local news, radio, tv stations, blogs, meet up groups, etc know what this day is about.

  Even if you can not fly this day, you can still help by spreading the word about drones, use the hash tag #InternationalDroneDay #dronesforgood .”

 

 

Sign up to join a team and participate here at That Drone Show

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

National Geographic’s Profile Of The Dogs Of War

 

Picture of Marine Corporal John Dolezal posing with Cchaz, a Belgian Malinois

 

 

 

” Not all military dogs are suited to combat. Some wither in the heat or become too excited by the sounds of gunfire or explosions, even after they’ve been desensitized to them in training. Some are too loyal, too lazy, or too playful. Each dog is its own particular, sometimes peculiar, universe. Still, certain breeds generally do better than others on the battlefield, such as German shepherds, Labrador retrievers, and especially the Belgian Malinois, which is known for being fearless, driven, and able to handle the heat.

  But what works in a given environment may not work in another. History suggests that each battle situation calls for its own breed and tactics. Benjamin Franklin encouraged the use of dogs against the Indians. They “will confound the enemy a good deal,” he wrote, “and be very serviceable. This was the Spanish method of guarding their marches.” (Spanish conquistadores were said to have used bullmastiffs against Native Americans.)”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” During the Second Seminole War, starting in 1835, the U.S. military used Cuban-bred bloodhounds to track Indians in the swamps of Florida. Dogs were said to have guarded soldiers in the Civil War. During World War I both sides used tens of thousands of dogs as messengers. In World War II the U.S. Marines deployed dogs on Pacific islands to sniff out Japanese positions. In Vietnam an estimated 4,000 canines were used to lead jungle patrols, saving numerous lives. (Nevertheless, the military decided to leave many behind when the U.S. pulled out.)”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read the whole story at National Geographic