Tag Archive: Slooh Space Camera


Geminid Meteor Shower: Dust From An Asteroid

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

” The Geminid meteor shower of 2014 will peak overnight on Dec. 13 and 14, but the shower as a whole is active between Dec. 4 and Dec. 17. NASA is predicting between 100 and 120 meteors per hour for observer’s with optimum observing conditions (dark, clear skies away from city lights). Several webcasts by NASA, Slooh and others are available to watch the meteors. The best time to begin looking for Geminid meteors will be about 9 p.m. or 10 p.m. your local time, since the last quarter moon will rise around midnight. 

  The Geminids are a meteor shower that happens every December. NASA says astronomers consider it one of the “best and most reliable” showers of the year, but the shower actually did not start occurring until very recently (in astronomical and human terms).

  First reports of the shower emerged in the mid-1800s, but at the time there were only 10-20 meteors per hour. These days, it’s more like 120 meteors at the peak.

  Astronomers are puzzled about the number of meteors observed. While scientists have known for a generation about the source of the shower – an asteroid named 3200 Phaethon – the volume of the shower’s meteors is strange given the observed amount of debris.

  The Geminids appear to come from the constellation Gemini, but in reality it is fragments of 3200 Phaethon that cause the sky fireworks. The asteroid has a debris trail in orbit around the sun. Once a year, Earth runs into this dusty path, which intersects our planet’s path through space.”

 

Space.com

 

 

 

   NASA offers more information along with a webchat page and a Ustream link from a telescope at the Marshall Space Flight Center with a live stream for those whose view is obstructed by the weather .

 

 

NASA Geminids Ustream

 

 

 

   Fox News offers a viewing conditions guide as well as a link to Slooh live broadcasts:

 

 

 

” Those who do not have suitable viewing conditions for the Geminid Meteor Shower’s peak can view Slooh’s live broadcast of the event below, which is set to air on Saturday, Dec. 13 at 8:00 p.m. EST.”

  The event will broadcast from two locations beginning with Slooh’s flagship observatory at the Institute of Astrophysics, Canary Islands, and later from Prescott, Arizona, at Prescott Observatory.”

 

 

Slooh Geminids

 

 

” The Geminids are very strange because they hit Earth sideways,” Berman said. “These meteors hit us gently. While Summer’s Perseids strike Earth at 37 miles per second, that’s amazingly fast, and the Leonids are even a little bit faster, hitting us at just over 40 miles a second, these Geminids hit us at only 22 miles a second.” “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Surprising Lunar Eclipse Wows Skywatchers

 

 

 

” The moon toe-dipped through the Earth’s shadow in a partial lunar eclipse Thursday (April 25), but stargazers around the world still captured surprisingly spectacular views of what they expected to be a minor celestial event.

Partial lunar eclipses like Thursday’s event occasionally receive a bad rap because they aren’t nearly as dramatic as the red glow of the moon during a total lunar eclipse, and some times they aren’t even noticeable. That, however, wasn’t the case last night.

A live webcast from a telescope in Dubai and hosted by the online Slooh Space Camera streamed amazing views of the lunar eclipse at its peak around 4 p.m. EDT (2000 GMT). The lunar eclipse’s entirety was primarily visible from Africa, Eastern Europe, Central Asia and Western Europe, so stargazers in other parts of the world had to rely on webcasts like those provided by Slooh and the Virtual Telescope Project in Italy to catch the event.”

 

Earth Gets A Rush Of Weekend Asteroid Visitors

 

Asteroids

 

 

 

 ” An asteroid as big as a city block shot relatively close by the Earth on Saturday, the latest in a series of visiting celestial objects including an asteroid the size of a bus that exploded over Russia last month, injuring 1,500.

Discovered just six days ago, the 460-foot long (140-meter) Asteroid 2013 ET passed about 600,000 miles from Earth at 3:30 p.m. EST. That’s about 2-1/2 times as far as the moon, fairly close on a cosmic yardstick.

The scary part of this one is that it’s something we didn’t even know about,” Patrick Paolucci, president of Slooh Space Camera, said during a webcast featuring live images of the asteroid from a telescope in the Canary Islands.

Moving at a speed of about 26,000 miles per hour, the asteroid could have wiped out a large city if it had impacted the Earth, added Slooh telescope engineer Paul Cox.”