Tag Archive: smartphones


Samsung Galaxy S6 Release Date March 2? Flagship Could Launch At MWC With Waterproof Variant

 

 

 

 

 

 

” Samsung Electronics Co.’s latest flagship smartphone, the Galaxy S6 may include a host of surprises, including two curves edges and a second, waterproof version, the S6 Active. The phone may be unveiled March 2 at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Chinese publication, the Chosunilbo reported Wednesday.

  The Galaxy S5 was Samsung’s first flagship smartphone to feature an IP67 certification, which allows the device to withstand submersion in up to 3.2 feet of water for up to 30 minutes. Despite making Galaxy S5 waterproof, Samsung also launched water Galaxy S5 Active and Galaxy S5 Sport models in 2014, intending to reach niche audiences.

  This time, the manufacturer may forgo a waterproof certification on the original Galaxy S6 to set a clear distinction between the flagship and Active models. A  second waterproof Galaxy S6 Active version  is expected to come at a later date, according to Italian publication Webtrek. “

 

IBT has more

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

iPhone 6 Review

 

 

 

 

” There is explosive demand for bigger smartphones. A 4-inch smartphone feels small now; somewhere around 5 inches is the new normal. Yet too many large-screen phones are cumbersome, awkward, and often just plain bad. And Apple has a long history of taking good ideas with obviously huge markets, and being the first manufacturer to really nail the execution.

  Add those three things together, and this phone on my desk isn’t at all surprising. It’s the iPhone 6, a bigger, brighter, badder iPhone designed to appeal to the customers for whom the iPhone 5S and its 4-inch screen now seem adorably antiquated. (Which is basically everybody.) It starts at $199 on a two-year contract, and comes in silver, gold, and space gray. It’s full of new technology and crafted from a new mold. Apple intends for it to be the new standard in a new type of smartphone, to be the big-screen phone that anyone can handle. Not the first big phone, but the best. The big phone for everyone.

  Of course, Samsung, HTC, and others have been making big phones too, and they have years of iteration and millions of sales to show for it. This is Cupertino’s steepest climb yet: can it leapfrog the entrenched competition and prove that Apple can do better?

The big iPhone has a big job to do. “

 

The Verge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The New Moto X Could Be The Best Android Phone Ever Made

 

 

 

 

 

” Today, Motorola announced its second-generation Moto X, the successor to the company’s rebooted flagship smartphone that was unveiled just over a year ago. Yes, the phone will simply be called Moto X again — not X+1, as some rumors had suggested — and it’ll be available for the same $499 unlocked as the original when it launches later in September (that’s for 16GB; the 32GB version runs at a $50 premium). AT&T, among others, will be offering it starting at $99 on contract.

  I’ve had a chance to spend some time with the new X this week, and something strange happened: I fell in love with it the moment I first held it.

  I say that’s strange because we’ve reached a point where even mediocre smartphones are pretty wonderful. They just aren’t getting better in simple, obvious ways that normal humans can understand with the same relentless velocity that they used to. The mind-blowing outliers — the phones that make you instantly relieve yourself of several hundred dollars without a second thought — are becoming scarce and far between. Basically, it’s hard to fall in love with a phone when every phone is lovable.”

 

 

The Verge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Smartphone Apps Multiply, But So Do Germs

 

 

” As innovators descended on the Consumer Electronics Show, companies offering better sanitizing were also promoting the cause of cleanliness.

  The technology show has long had a focus on health, but makers of sanitizing devices said people need to look in their pockets and purses to the microbes on their personal gadgets.

  The smartphone “is always warm, stored in dark places, so bacterias are growing on your phone,” said Dan Barnes, co-founder of Phonesoap, which was displaying its device which sanitizes a phone and recharges it.

  Barnes said he got the idea after reading a study indicating “that mobile phones are 18 times dirtier than public bathrooms.”

  Barnes said his $50 device uses ultraviolet radiation which “kills the bacteria’s DNA, so that they can’t live on your phone anymore.”

 

 

Story continues

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Voice Of Siri Is Susan Bennett

 

 

 

 

” “I’m the original voice of Siri.” That’s the quote CNN attributes to Susan Bennett, a voice talent that says her voice was used for Apple’s virtual assistant. “I wasn’t sure that I wanted the notoriety,” Bennett tells CNN, explaining her delay in coming forward, “and I also wasn’t sure where I stood legally.” In fact, it was The Verge‘s article on synthesized speech that prompted her to come forward.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Footage Surfaces Of People Using Toes, Cats’ Paws And Nipples To Unlock The iPhone 5s

 

 

 

” It was heralded as a major step forward in smartphone security, grabbing the headlines when Apple unveiled its newest iPhone earlier this month.

Yet the fingerprint sensor on the iPhone 5s has become the subject of stifled giggles after videos emerged showing users unlocking the handset with big toes, cats’ paws and even their own nipples.

Already questions have been raised about the security implications of the new technology after a group of German hackers claimed to have bypassed Apple’s TouchID by taking prints from a glass surface.

Throughout the weekend technology bloggers found weird and wonderful ways to use the sensor. Here are five of the weirdest, accompanied with video footage.”

 

 

See more …

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5 Terrifying Smartphone Hacks You Won’t Believe Are Possible

” … a cadre of supervillains (ahem, “researchers”) from Georgia Tech decided to create a program that turns your innocent-looking smartphone into a nosy little asshole that sits there spying on your every keystroke. Passwords, email messages, IMVU sex chats — your phone could be eavesdropping on all of it.

  Sometimes we fail to appreciate the fact that today, right now, we’re living in a sci-fi universe. The smartphone is a miracle of mathematics and engineering genius, converting a little over 4 ounces of inert matter into a Star Trek-level wondercomputer. But the downside of storing your entire world inside an ass-pocket-dwelling supercomputer is that there are always those who are itching to turn that technology against you in ways you’d never expect, like …

#5. Your Phone’s Tilt Sensor Can Sense What You’re Typing on Your Computer

 
As you clack away on the keyboard, your phone’s accelerometer can pick up the tiny impacts resounding through your desk and, based on the distance of the keys from the phone, mathemagically deduce which keys you’re stroking.

  Phones with motion sensitivity on the level of an iPhone 4 can guess what you’re typing with up to 80 percent accuracy. And this clever bit of spyware can easily Trojan horse its way onto your phone as part of an otherwise trustworthy-looking app, since it doesn’t arouse your tinfoil-hat suspicions by asking for permission to use your camera or microphone.”

#4. Smartphones Can Steal Your Credit Card Information Just by Being Near Them

#3. Fake “Free Charging” Stations May Be Waiting to Ambush You

#2. Fake Cell Towers Can Turn Your Phone into a Remote Listening Device

#1. Big Brother Can Use Your Phone to Spy on You in 3D

READ THE WHOLE TERRIFYING ARTICLE

Almost Half Of iPhone Apps Peek At Your Private Stuff

 

 

” Computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego discovered that nearly half of the mobile apps running on Apple’s iOS operating system have gained access to private data. These findings are based on a study of 130,000 users of jailbroken iOS devices, where users have removed restrictions that keep apps from accessing the iPhone’s operating system.

One might assume that the results are skewed because the study participants were using a jailbroken iPhone. However, the majority of applications in the study were downloaded through Apple’s App Store and were able to access the same information on locked phones as well.

In March, Apple stopped accepting new applications or app updates that access these “unique identifiers,” or privacy invaders. However, the findings suggest that although this update was made to the App Store policy, many apps can still get that information. Unique identifiers allow the creators of the app and advertisers to track a user’s behavior through all the different apps on their devices. Some apps even associate the unique identifier with the user’s email and other personal information.

The researchers developed an app called ProtectMyPrivacy (PMP) that is able to detect what data the other apps running on an iOS device are trying to access. Their application enables users to selectively allow or deny access to information on an app-by-app basis, based on whether they feel the apps need the information to function properly.

The team has also added notifications and recommendations for when an app accesses other privacy-sensitive information, such as a devices’ front and back camera, microphone and photos.”

“We wanted to empower users to take control of their privacy,” said Yuvraj Agarwal, a research scientist in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at UC San Diego who co-authored the study. “The choice should be in users’ hands.”