Advertisements

Tag Archive: The Federalist Papers


Arizona Voters Approve Proposition To Reject Federal Acts

 

 

 

 

 

 

” Today, voters in Arizona approved a ballot measure that follows James Madison’s advice to stop federal overreach. With 80% reporting, the tally held steady and increasing at 51-49%.

  Approved was Proposition 122, a state constitutional amendment that enshrines the anti-commandeering doctrine in the state constitution. The language amends the state constitution to give Arizona the ability to “exercise its sovereign authority to restrict the actions of its personnel and the use of its financial resources to purposes that are consistent with the Constitution.”

This language is consistent with the advice of James Madison, who wrote in Federalist #46:

  Should an unwarrantable measure of the federal government be unpopular in particular States, which would seldom fail to be the case, or even a warrantable measure be so, which may sometimes be the case, the means of opposition to it are powerful and at hand. The disquietude of the people; their repugnance and, perhaps, refusal to co-operate with the officers of the Union; the frowns of the executive magistracy of the State; the embarrassments created by legislative devices, which would often be added on such occasions, would oppose, in any State, difficulties not to be despised; would form, in a large State, very serious impediments; and where the sentiments of several adjoining States happened to be in unison, would present obstructions which the federal government would hardly be willing to encounter. [emphasis added] “

 

Tenth Amendment Center

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

The Federalist Papers

“They’ll warn that tyranny is always lurking just around the corner . You should reject these voices .”

Barack Hussein Obama

” The truth is that all men having power ought to be mistrusted . “

James Madison 

Who do you suppose is the wiser individual ? Mr “scholar” we are a Republic , not a democracy !

The Federalist Papers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Special Subsidies For Hill Workers Trample On The Founders’ Code Of Equal Application Of The Law

 

 

” As close observers of history and human nature, James Madison and the other Founders of the U.S. Constitution knew that the equal and unbiased application of the law to all people, especially elected officials, is essential to freedom and justice and one of the primary safeguards from authoritarianism and oppression by a ruling class.

And so, referring to the members of Congress, James Madison wrote in Federalist No. 57: “[T]hey can make no law which will not have its full operation on themselves and their friends, as well as on the great mass of the society.”

Today, elected officials need to be reminded of these truths. Under pressure from Congress, the White House has carved out a special exemption for Congress and its staffers from ObamaCare—the law it recently deemed necessary for the entire country. No Republicans voted for ObamaCare. Yet it appears that some of them support the exemption President Obama approved on his own—so they would not have to go on record with a vote for or against it.

Congress complains that without its special subsidies the Hill will suffer a “brain drain” as staffers leave their jobs because of increasing out-of-pocket insurance costs. Heaven forbid Congress suffer the same fate as private companies like UPS, which recently had to cut health-care benefits entirely for employees’ spouses; or labor unions, like the 40,000 International Longshore and Warehouse Union workers who recently left the AFL-CIO citing as one factor ObamaCare’s tax on their “Cadillac” health-care plans.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Get a FREE copy of the “Life, Correspondence & Speeches of Patrick Henry – Volume One” by William Wirt Henry

 

 

” This is the epic story of Patrick Henry in his own words. Remembered largely for his cry for “liberty or death,” Henry was one of the first (and most colorful) of America’s Founding Fathers—first to call Americans to arms against Britain, first to demand a bill of rights, and first to fight the growth of big government after the Revolution.

As quick with a rifle as he was with his tongue, Henry was America’s greatest orator and courtroom lawyer, who mixed histrionics and hilarity to provoke tears or laughter from judges and jurors alike.

This is history at its best, telling a story both human and philosophical. Henry’s words continue to echo across America and inspire millions to fight government intrusion in their daily lives.

To download your FREE copy of “Life, Correspondence & Speeches of Patrick Henry – Volume One” by William Wirt Henry please right mouse click on the link, then select “save as” and download to your computer – Life, Correspondence & Speeches-of-Patrick-Henry-Volume-One

Related Posts

Life, Correspondence & Speeches of Patrick Henry Volume One
Life, Correspondence & Speeches of Patrick Henry Volume Two
Life, Correspondence & Speeches of Patrick Henry Volume Three “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The True Thomas Jefferson

 

The True Thomas Jefferson by William E. Curtis book cover

 

” The True Thomas Jefferson is not a formal biography, it is intended to be a series of sketches as graphic and as accurate as possible, without partisanship or prejudice, of a remarkable man.

Thomas Jefferson has been the subject of several able and distinguished biographers, friendly and unfriendly, for whom he left an abundance of material carefully arranged by his own hand. His writings, public and private, which are more voluminous than those of any other American statesman, have twice been published, and furnish direct evidence concerning his acts and opinions.

His views upon public questions have been carefully arranged in alphabetical order in an encyclopedia, to which the student of his life and times may turn with satisfaction and confidence. From these and many other original sources the information presented in this volume has been gathered and arranged in unconventional form in order that the reader may see the man as he actually was, and not as his partisans and opponents represent him.

The purpose of his life, which appears on almost every page, was to build a nation upon this continent with human freedom and equality as its foundations. In his efforts to accomplish this end he often incurred the criticisms of his friends as well as the condemnation of his enemies. His faults were as conspicuous as his abilities, and to form a correct estimate of his character both should receive equal and honest consideration.”

To download “The True Thomas Jefferson” by William E. Curtis for future reading please right mouse click, then click save to download – The-True-Thomas-Jefferson “

 

 

Brought to you through the generosity of The Federalist Papers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nullification Is No Crackpot Theory

 

 

 

” In a May 2 column [Alabama State Senate Embraces Crackpot, Antebellum Legal Theory], Robert Schlesinger relegated the idea of nullification to the historical trash heap. But if James Madison and Thomas Jefferson strolled down the streets of D.C. today, listening to current political discourse, they’d likely declare conventional wisdom holding the federal government supreme in all it does a “crackpot post-antebellum legal theory.”

Even Alexander Hamilton would undoubtedly express shock. After all, he was one of the first Constitution defenders to point out the limits of federal supremacy in Federalist 33.

Thirteen independent sovereign political societies came together to form the United States, delegating specific powers to a general government. Both supporters and opponents of the Constitution agreed the new government was to remain limited. The ratification debate revolved around one question: Would the Constitution create the limited government intended?

When anti-federalists insisted the government wouldn’t remain constrained, Madison countered that the states would serve as a check. In Federalist 46, he wrote that state “refusal to cooperate with officers of the Union” and “legislative devices, which would often be added on such occasions” would serve to “present obstructions.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Constitution Of The United States

 

 

Constitution of The United States and Principles of Constitutional Analysis Book Cover

 

 

 

” The Constitution of the United States is the supreme law of the United States of America.

The first three Articles of the Constitution establish the rules and separate powers of the three branches of the federal government: a legislature, the bicameral Congress; an executive branch led by the President; and a federal judiciary headed by the Supreme Court. The last four Articles frame the principle of federalism. The Tenth Amendment confirms its federal characteristics.

The Constitution was adopted on September 17, 1787, by the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and ratified by conventions in eleven states. It went into effect on March 4, 1789.[2] The first ten constitutional amendments ratified by three-fourths of the states in 1791 are known as the Bill of Rights. The Constitution has been amended seventeen additional times (for a total of 27 amendments) and its principles are applied in courts of law.

This guide contains the Constitution, Bill of Rights, Additional Amendments and an explanation of the principles of Constitutional interpretation.

 

To download the Constitution of the United States for future reading please right mouse click, then click save to download – The-Constitution-of-the-United-States 

 

 

 

The Federalist Papers

 

 

 

The Federalist Papers

 

 

The Federalist Papers

 

 

Illustration Courtesy of US War Dogs Association 

The Federalist Papers

The Federalist …

The Federalist Papers

 

 

  ” If a nation expects to be ignorant and free , in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be. The functionaries of every government have propensities to command at will the liberty and property of their constituents. There is no safe deposit for these but with the people themselves; nor can they be safe with them without information. Where the press is free, and every man able to read, all is safe.

Thomas Jefferson, to Colonel Charles Yancey, January 6, 1816 “

This Says It All

The Federalist Papers