Tag Archive: Transportation


Drones And Robotic Warfare You Just Can’t Imagine

 

 

 

 

” Drones can essentially conduct perch and stare missions nearly endlessly. The technology is developing even more rapidly than the military can grasp, says the director of MIT’s Humans and Automation Laboratory.

  In just the past two years, it seems as if drones are everywhere in the news. This technology has been around for more than 60 years, but has only recently captured both national and international attention. This is primarily because of the increasing use in the military, but also because of concerns that such technology will be turned on a country’s own citizens.

  The average person thinks of a drone as a flying spy camera, loitering overhead waiting to spot a target and then possibly launching a weapon when that target is labeled as a threat. To be sure, this is indeed one mission of drones, typically of organizations like the CIA.

  However, this is by far the least common mission. The vast majority of military drone missions today are data and image collection. Their ability to provide “situational awareness” to decision makers on the ground is unparalleled in military operations since drones can essentially conduct perch and stare missions nearly endlessly.

  This is why their use and demand from the trenches has been so high – they provide an ability to watch as events unfold, providing some clarity to the fog of war, which is the Achilles Heel for military leaders.

  However, in the very near future, these intelligence surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) missions will be dwarfed by other uses of drones in operations inconceivable to most military personnel today.

  They will be used to enhance communications, patrol the skies, intercept incoming ballistic and short range missiles, dog fight with other aircraft in the sky, and deliver supplies. Indeed, currently the US Marine Corps has two robotic helicopters that have moved millions of pounds of goods and have been critical in current drawdown efforts.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How (And When) To Snag Cheap Fares

 

 

 

” When is the best time to get the best value on airfare? It’s the most-asked question travelers pose, and as spring break approaches, it helps to know that a recent study puts the average answer for a domestic trip at roughly seven weeks.

“Of course, a million caveats apply,” says Jeff Klees, chief executive ofCheapAir.com, an airfare-shopping engine. “If you’re more flexible on your travel dates and time, you can get away with waiting closer to the time to travel.”

In a study of “every possible trip combination” over 11,000 routes, CheapAir dissected more than 560 million fare-search records from 2012’s 366 days. “For any given flight, the actual best time to buy might vary, depending on the market, the time of year, the day of week and other factors,” Mr. Klees says.

But the short answer is 49 days before your departure for domestic flights, while the sweet spot for international flights is 81 days.”

 

Why Would An American President Ever Do This?

Executive Orders Disposition Tables 
John F. Kennedy – 1962