Tag Archive: Trojan Horse


Who’s Buying Obamacare, In Three Charts

 

 

” More than 2.1 million Americans selected private health plans through healthcare.gov and state-run websites through Dec. 28, the Obama administration announced today. Another 1.6 million were judged eligible for Medicaid, the federal-state insurance program for the poor. Most of the new enrollees in private health plans—1.8 million—signed up in December, after the White House relaunched the Affordable Care Act’s stuttering website on Dec. 1.

  Most of the people who bought coverage on the exchanges this fall got subsidies to help them afford the premiums. That’s in contrast to the first month of the program, when less than one-third of buyers were subsidized. People earning up to four times the poverty rate—as much as $96,000 a year for a family of four—can get help buying coverage.”

 

Business Week has more

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TNR: Why, Yes, ObamaCare Is A Trojan Horse For Single-Payer

 

 

 

” Now it can be told. Emphasis on “now”:

 

Obamacare Trojan Horse

 

 

” Precisely. ObamaCare will stumble along for the rest of the year, with a new wave of public irritation to come once small businesses start dumping employees onto the exchanges en masse, but the prospects for repeal will remain dim even if the GOP takes back the Senate. The numbers in Congress just aren’t there to beat an Obama veto, and by 2017 so many millions will have been assimilated into the program that some critical mass of GOP centrists will end up taking a “mend it, don’t end it” approach. Only an adverse-selection catastrophe on the exchanges will raise premiums enough (or require a hefty enough federal bailout) to endanger the program. And lefties like Michael Moore and Noam Scheiber, who wrote the TNR piece, know it. That’s why you’re starting to hear them talk more openly about single-payer: Partly it’s because they want to get a jump on nudging the Democratic agenda to the left for 2016, partly it’s because they want repeal-minded Republicans to be happy with the status quo, but partly too it’s a simple product of safety. They can talk about this now because, unlike early 2010, there’s no political risk in doing so.”