Tag Archive: Uniform Crime Report


The Most Dangerous States In America

 

 

 

 

 

The number of violent crimes dropped across the United States by 4.4% in 2013 compared to the year before, according to estimates released by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). In the last decade, the number of violent crimes declined by nearly 15%.

  In a previous interview with 24/7 Wall St., John Roman, senior fellow at public policy research organization The Urban Institute said, “A 4.4% reduction in violent crime is astonishing. If you saw a similar increase in GDP, or a similar decrease in unemployment, it would be huge national news.”

  Despite the national improvement in crime rates — as well as significant improvements in some of the most dangerous states — a number of states were much more dangerous than the rest of the nation. In fact, South Carolina and Delaware had among the largest decreases in violent crime and still had some of the highest violent crime rates last year.

  Nationwide, 368 violent crimes were reported for every 100,000 people in 2013. Such crimes include murder, rape, aggravated assault, and robbery. In America’s 10 most dangerous states, there were well more than 400 violent crimes reported per 100,000 residents. Based on violent crime rates published by the FBI’s 2013 Uniform Crime Report, these are America’s most dangerous states.

  Murder and non-negligent manslaughter were especially common in the most dangerous states. All but one of the states reported a higher murder and non-negligent manslaughter rate than the national rate of 4.5 incidents per 100,000 people. In Louisiana, nearly 11 murders were reported per 100,000 people, the highest in the nation.

  To identify the most dangerous states in America, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed violent crime rates from the FBI’s 2013 Uniform Crime Report. Property crime rates also came from the FBI’s report. The data were broken into eight types of crime. Violent crime was comprised of murder and non-negligent manslaughter, rape, robbery, and aggravated assault; and, property crime was comprised of burglary, arson, larceny, and motor vehicle theft. In addition to crime data, we also reviewed median household income, poverty rates, and educational attainment rates from the 2013 Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

These are the most dangerous states in America. “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Refute This Media Stooges

FBI UCR

 

 

Overview

  • In 2011, an estimated 1,203,564 violent crimes occurred nationwide, a decrease of 3.8 percent from the 2010 estimate.
  • When considering 5- and 10-year trends, the 2011 estimated violent crime total was 15.4 percent below the 2007 level and 15.5 percent below the 2002 level.
  • There were an estimated 386.3 violent crimes per 100,000 inhabitants in 2011.
  • Aggravated assaults accounted for the highest number of violent crimes reported to law enforcement at 62.4 percent. Robbery comprised 29.4 percent of violent crimes, forcible rape accounted for 6.9 percent, and murder accounted for 1.2 percent of estimated violent crimes in 2011.
  • Information collected regarding type of weapon showed that firearms were used in 67.7 percent of the nation’s murders, 41.3 percent of robberies, and 21.2 percent of aggravated assaults. (Weapons data are not collected for forcible rape.) (SeeExpanded Homicide Data Table 7Robbery Table 3, and the Aggravated Assault Table.)

 

Violent Crime Offense Figure

 

Explain The Need For Ever More Stringent ” Crime Prevention ” Laws .

 

 

 

Is Gun Violence Soaring in America?

 

 

 

 

  Since the statistics make no distinction between perpetrators and their intended victims , perhaps the shrinking fatality rate in tandem with the burgeoning growth in the treatment of wounds is indicative of a civilian population that has made great inroads toward fighting back and now there are less dead victims and more wounded perps .

Or maybe in this world of the Obama ” Hope & Change ” economy no one can afford to buy the ammo necessary for target practice and thus their aim is off . 

 

 

 ” Well, the article itself cast doubt about the claim in subsequent paragraphs:

 

Criminologists say they are cautious about using such medical statistics to draw conclusions because of year-to-year inconsistencies in the number of medical institutions reporting data. The FBI collects annual homicide and aggravated assault statistics but doesn’t have reliable numbers for gun and knife attacks.

Jens Ludwig, a law professor and the director of the University of Chicago Crime Lab, said he was leery of any number beyond reported homicides.

“Homicide is the one thing we’re measuring well,” he said. “Everything else is subject to much more uncertainty,” including varying numbers of emergency departments contributing data, as well as differences in how injuries are classified.

So, can we trust those numbers?  The short answer is “no.”  In his own analysis of the data, Kent Scheidegger, the Legal Director of the Criminal Justice Legal Foundation, said the following about the WSJ article:

It is certainly a very good thing that doctors are able to save more shooting victims, but take the “soaring gun violence” part with a grain of salt.  Aggravated assaults per capita are down 16% from 2007 to 2011, according to the FBI’s UCR, and down 24% from 2001 to 2011.  Did assaults with guns really soar while aggravated assaults overall were dropping?  I’ll join Prof. Ludwig in the leery section.”

Is Gun Violence Soaring in America?

 

  Since the statistics make no distinction between perpetrators and their intended victims , perhaps the shrinking fatality rate in tandem with the burgeoning growth in the treatment of wounds is indicative of a civilian population that has made great inroads toward fighting back and now there are less dead victims and more wounded perps .

Or maybe in this world of the Obama ” Hope & Change ” economy no one can afford to buy the ammo necessary for target practice and thus their aim is off . 

 

 

 ” Well, the article itself cast doubt about the claim in subsequent paragraphs:

 

Criminologists say they are cautious about using such medical statistics to draw conclusions because of year-to-year inconsistencies in the number of medical institutions reporting data. The FBI collects annual homicide and aggravated assault statistics but doesn’t have reliable numbers for gun and knife attacks.

Jens Ludwig, a law professor and the director of the University of Chicago Crime Lab, said he was leery of any number beyond reported homicides.

“Homicide is the one thing we’re measuring well,” he said. “Everything else is subject to much more uncertainty,” including varying numbers of emergency departments contributing data, as well as differences in how injuries are classified.

So, can we trust those numbers?  The short answer is “no.”  In his own analysis of the data, Kent Scheidegger, the Legal Director of the Criminal Justice Legal Foundation, said the following about the WSJ article:

 

It is certainly a very good thing that doctors are able to save more shooting victims, but take the “soaring gun violence” part with a grain of salt.  Aggravated assaults per capita are down 16% from 2007 to 2011, according to the FBI’s UCR, and down 24% from 2001 to 2011.  Did assaults with guns really soar while aggravated assaults overall were dropping?  I’ll join Prof. Ludwig in the leery section.”