Tag Archive: University of Chicago


Spinosaurus Fossil: ‘Giant Swimming Dinosaur’ Unearthed

 

 

 

” A giant fossil, unearthed in the Sahara desert, has given scientists an unprecedented look at the largest-known carnivorous dinosaur:Spinosaurus.

The 95-million-year-old remains confirm a long-held theory: that this is the first-known swimming dinosaur.

  Scientists say the beast had flat, paddle-like feet and nostrils on top of its crocodilian head that would allow it to submerge with ease.  

  Lead author Nizar Ibrahim, a palaeontologist from the University of Chicago, said: “It is a really bizarre dinosaur – there’s no real blueprint for it.”

 

 

Life-size reconstruction of Spinosaurus

 

 

” It has a long neck, a long trunk, a long tail, a 7ft (2m) sail on its back and a snout like a crocodile.

” And when we look at the body proportions, the animal was clearly not as agile on land as other dinosaurs were, so I think it spent a substantial amount of time in the water.” 

The team says that Spinosaurus was a fearsome beast.

  The researchers say that, at more than 15m (50ft) from nose to tail, it was potentially the largest of all the carnivorous dinosaurs – bigger even than the mighty Tyrannosaurus rex. ” 

 

BBC Science

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Obama’s NSA Watchdog: Tracking Cars Is Reasonable

 

 

 

” If one member of President Obama’s NSA review group charged with recommending surveillance policy gets his way, tracking cars could become a routine procedure in law enforcement.

  University of Chicago law professor Geoffrey Stone took issue with a Supreme Court ruling in the case of the Jones GPS Tracking case. Stone took his case to the Stanford University Law Review in an article entitled, “A Reasonableness Approach to Searches After the Jones GPS Tracking Case.”

 

     Here is a helpful hint on how to locate a tracking device on your own car :  

                                                                               How to Find a GPS System Under a Car | eHow

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meet Nobel Laureates Hansen , Shiller & Fama

 

 

 

 

 

Lars Peter Hansen Nobelist

” Hansen’s work is the most technical and most difficult to explain to a layperson. The brief version is that in 1982 Hansen developed the Generalized Method of Moments a new and elegant way to estimate many economic models that requires fewer assumptions and is often more powerful than other methods.”

 

 

Robert Shiller, Nobel Laureate

” Robert Shiller spent much of his career at Yale University.  He is a famous economist for his analysis of speculative bubbles and price overreaction to new information, first in stock markets and then later in real estate markets.  He has been a leading candidate for a Nobel Prize for some time now.

Here is Shiller’s home page.  Here is Shiller on Wikipedia.  Here are short columns by Shiller on Project Syndicate.  He also writes regularly for the Sunday New York Times, and some of his columns are here.  Here is a 2005 David Leonhardt profile of Shiller.”

 

 

Eugene Fama, Nobel Prize Laureate

” Fama has been long-deserving for some time now.  He won basically for his empirical work on asset prices.

Here is Fama on Wikipedia.  Here is Fama on scholar.google.com.

Fama teaches at the Booth School of Business at the University of Chicago and he is very much in the classic mold of a Chicago School economist.  I feared that with the financial crisis Fama would be too unpopular a pick, because many people misinterpret “efficient markets theory,” so this was a prize which valued the economic impact of the research over the trendiness.  That said, giving the prize to Shiller as well is a nod in the direction of behavioral finance and inefficient markets theory, so the committee covered all the bases.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An Economic Giant

  ” Friedman, indeed, is one of the few scholars whose receipt of the Nobel Prize in Economics – which he received in 1976 – did at least as much to bestow prestige on that award as that award did to bestow prestige on him. (The first Nobel
Prize in Economics wasn’t awarded until 1969.)

image

   Friedman’s stupendous scholarly achievements alone justify commemoration of the centenary
of his birth. But at least as important as Friedman’s scholarship was his lucid and energetic public advocacy of limited government and free
markets. He explained with unmatched clarity how a modern economy’s complexities,nuances, and dynamism almost always thwart even the best-intentioned efforts by government officials to intervene into markets. “