Tag Archive: Web browsing


Growing Backlash To Government Surveillance

 

 

 

 

” From Silicon Valley to the South Pacific, counterattacks to revelations of widespread National Security Agency surveillance are taking shape, from a surge of new encrypted email programs to technology that sprinkles the Internet with red flag terms to confuse would-be snoops.”

 

 

 

 

” Policy makers, privacy advocates and political leaders around the world have been outraged at the near weekly disclosures from former intelligence contractor Edward Snowden that expose sweeping U.S. government surveillance programs.”

 

 

 

 

” “Until this summer, people didn’t know anything about the NSA,” said Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University co-director Amy Zegart. “Their own secrecy has come back to bite them.”

Activists are fighting back with high-tech civil disobedience, entrepreneurs want to cash in on privacy concerns, Internet users want to keep snoops out of their computers and lawmakers want to establish stricter parameters.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Or At Least Make It More Difficult

 

 

 

 

 

Assuming that your data is being watched, what might you do to hide it?

 

First, consider not putting so much stuff out there in the first place. Wuergler devised a program he calls Stalker that can siphon off nearly all of your digital information to put together an amazingly complete portrait of your life and pretty much find out where you are at all times. Use Facebook if you must, but realize you’re making it easy for the government to track and find you when they choose to do so.

A second step toward increased privacy is to use a browser like DuckDuckGo, which does not collect the sort of information—say, your IP address—that can identify you with your Internet searches. Thus, if the government bangs on their doors to find out what you’ve been up to, DuckDuckGo has nothing to hand over. I have decided to make DuckDuckGo my default for general browsing, turning to Google only for items such as breaking news and scholarly articles. (Presumably, the NSA would be able to tap into my searches on DuckDuckGo in real time.)

Third, TOR offers free software and a network of relays that can shield your location from prying eyes. TOR operates by bouncing your emails and files around the Internet through encrypted relays. Anyone intercepting your message once it exits a TOR relay cannot trace it back to your computer and your physical location. TOR is used by dissidents and journalists around the world. On the downside, in my experience it operates more slowly than, say, Google.” 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When Will Our Mobile Devices Get to Work?

 

 

 

” You’re about to head out on long business trip or extended working “vacation.” The question is, do you bring a smartphone, your laptop, or a tablet? 

For many people, the answer is all three. The phone is for answering calls, checking email, and sneaking Angry Birds; the tablet is for streaming videos; and the laptop is for all things truly work. But will lugging around a computer always be necessary?

The most important innovation for mobile productivity might be speech technology. Apps such as Ask Ziggy and Siri already handle spoken requests like “find me a hotel in San Francisco” or “remind me to call my wife in the morning,” and there are programs such as Nuance that let users dictate entire documents by voice. These kinds of programs have been around for years, but have improved greatly of late and require little training. ”