Tag Archive: World War I


 

 

Algerian soldiers line up in France in 1914. Watch Apocalypse ...

Algerian soldiers line up in France in 1914. Watch Apocalypse WWI.

Image Credit: Jules Gervais-Courtellemont

 

 

 

Here’s another sample …

 

 

Canadian machine gunners dig themselves in, in shell holes on ...

Canadian machine gunners dig themselves in, in shell holes on Vimy Ridge. 

Image Credit: Canada. Dept. of National Defence

 

 

See all 89 pictures at American Heroes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Marlin Machine Guns

 

 

” Most Marlin owners know of their long legacy of lever action rifles, .22 rimfire guns, and others. However, what most don’t know is that the company was one of the largest manufacturers of machine guns in World War One. 

The Marlin Machine Guns - christophereger - colt-m1895-2-7.jpg

The Colt-Marlin Light Machine Gun

 

” In 1915, during World War I, a New York syndicate bought the company from the sons of John Marlin, the company’s founder, and renamed it the Marlin Rockwell Corporation (MRC). In that same year, MRC obtained license to the 1895 Colt Light Machine Gun. Colt had been manufacturing their ‘potato-digger’ machine gun for twenty years and the weapon had been made in a half dozen calibers not only for the US Army and Navy but also for Belgium, Canada, France, Italy, and Imperial Russia. With World War I becoming a boom for Colt and other firearms manufacturers producing weapons for Western European clients, the company was anxious to rid itself of the old Model 1895. Colt sold all of the rights, tooling, plans, and patents to MRC and washed their hands of the old potato digger.” 

Today all of these Marlin guns are rarely encountered and when they do run over $10,000 in working condition. Not bad for a weapon that fought in two world wars.” 

The Road to World War 3

” We are on a road that leads straight to the World War 3, but in order to see that and to fully understand what is at stake you have to look at the big picture and connect the dots. This video examines the history of the dollar, its relation to oil, and the real motives behind the wars of the past two decades.”

Gun Review: Mauser P08: ‘Everything It’s Hyped To Be’ (VIDEO)

 

 

 

 

” It was one of the first semi-automatic pistols and the design was so good that it saw service through two World Wars. As a matter of fact, it continues to be used around the world today. Was it John M. Browning’s M1911? Nope — Georg J. Luger’s. We’re talking, of course, about the Mauser P08.

It’s a gun I knew and loved through the war movies I grew up watching. While I always rooted for the ‘good guys’ to defeat the Nazis, I always thought that the Germans had the cooler pistols. But it wasn’t until very recently that I had a chance to actually shoot a WWII-era version, a 4-inch barrel standard-army one made by Mauser in the early part of the war. And it was everything it’s hyped to be, so I was not disappointed.

Now, I won’t diss the 1911 because I love the design, and own several examples of it myself. Browning was a genius of the first water. But the P08 — commonly called the ‘Luger’ after its designer — is still a very cool design. I think that it is the articulated joint mechanism that operates it. It’s an obvious mechanical connection to an older time, like an evolutionary link that allows you to see something of how the thing works.”

 

 

Some Gave All …

November 11 , 2012

History of Veterans Day

  ” World War I – known at the time as “The Great War” – officially ended when the Treaty of Versailles was signed on June 28, 1919, in the Palace of Versailles outside the town of Versailles, France. However, fighting ceased seven months earlier when an armistice, or temporary cessation of hostilities, between the Allied nations and Germany went into effect on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month. For that reason, November 11, 1918, is generally regarded as the end of “the war to end all wars.”

Soldiers of the 353rd Infantry near a church at Stenay, Meuse in France.

Soldiers of the 353rd Infantry near a church at Stenay, Meuse in France, wait for the end of hostilities.  This photo was taken at 10:58 a.m., on November 11, 1918, two minutes before the armistice ending World War I went into effect

In Flanders Fields
John McCrae, 1915.

 In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.
We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields. 

“And all this madness, all this rage, all this flaming death of our civilization and our hopes, has been brought about because a set of official gentlemen, living luxurious lives, mostly stupid, and all without imagination or heart, have chosen that it should occur rather than that any one of them should suffer some infinitesimal rebuff to his country`s pride.”


 Bertrand Russell, 1914

“We were not making war against Germany, we were being ordered about in the King’s war with Germany.” 

H.G. Wells

Verdun

Remembering Belleau Wood

‘Retreat? Hell, we just got here!’ 

US Marine Captain Lloyd W. Williams

Tommy

I went into a public-'ouse to get a pint o' beer,
The publican 'e up an' sez, "We serve no red-coats here."
The girls be'ind the bar they laughed an' giggled fit to die,
I outs into the street again an' to myself sez I:
    O it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' "Tommy, go away";
    But it's "Thank you, Mister Atkins", when the band begins to play,
    The band begins to play, my boys, the band begins to play,
    O it's "Thank you, Mister Atkins", when the band begins to play.

I went into a theatre as sober as could be,
They gave a drunk civilian room, but 'adn't none for me;
They sent me to the gallery or round the music-'alls,
But when it comes to fightin', Lord! they'll shove me in the stalls!
    For it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' "Tommy, wait outside";
    But it's "Special train for Atkins" when the trooper's on the tide,
    The troopship's on the tide, my boys, the troopship's on the tide,
    O it's "Special train for Atkins" when the trooper's on the tide.

Yes, makin' mock o' uniforms that guard you while you sleep
Is cheaper than them uniforms, an' they're starvation cheap;
An' hustlin' drunken soldiers when they're goin' large a bit
Is five times better business than paradin' in full kit.
    Then it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' "Tommy, 'ow's yer soul?"
    But it's "Thin red line of 'eroes" when the drums begin to roll,
    The drums begin to roll, my boys, the drums begin to roll,
    O it's "Thin red line of 'eroes" when the drums begin to roll.

We aren't no thin red 'eroes, nor we aren't no blackguards too,
But single men in barricks, most remarkable like you;
An' if sometimes our conduck isn't all your fancy paints,
Why, single men in barricks don't grow into plaster saints;
    While it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' "Tommy, fall be'ind",
    But it's "Please to walk in front, sir", when there's trouble in the wind,
    There's trouble in the wind, my boys, there's trouble in the wind,
    O it's "Please to walk in front, sir", when there's trouble in the wind.

You talk o' better food for us, an' schools, an' fires, an' all:
We'll wait for extry rations if you treat us rational.
Don't mess about the cook-room slops, but prove it to our face
The Widow's Uniform is not the soldier-man's disgrace.
    For it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' "Chuck him out, the brute!"
    But it's "Saviour of 'is country" when the guns begin to shoot;
    An' it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' anything you please;
    An' Tommy ain't a bloomin' fool -- you bet that Tommy sees!

The Somme

‘This is not peace, it is an armistice for 20 years.’ 

Ferdinand Foch
After the Treaty of Versailles, 1919

Thank You Veterans 

We Will Never Forget

Remember

MEMORIAL DAY

The military don’t start wars.  Politicians start wars.  ~William Westmoreland

Remember

Nathan Hale, Spy and State Hero

Nathan Hale, a martyr soldier of the American Revolution, was born in Coventry, Conn., June 6, 1755. When but little more than twenty-one years old he was hanged, by order of General William Howe, as a spy, in the city of New York, on September 22, 1776.”

Napoleon :

“Soldiers usually win the battles and generals get the credit for them.”

Remember

“Historians know little about Crispus Attucks, and they have constructed accounts of his life more from speculation than facts. Most documents described his ancestry as African and American Indian. His father, Prince Yonger, is thought to have been a slave brought to America from Africa and that his mother, Nancy Attucks, was a Natick Indian. The family, which may have included an older sister named Phebe, lived in Framingham, Massachusetts.”

Otto Von Bismarck :

“Anyone who has ever looked into the glazed eyes of a soldier dying on the battlefield will think hard before starting a war.”

Remember

“Not all of the women soldiers of the Civil War were discharged so quickly. Some women served for years, like Sarah Emma Edmonds Seelye, and others served the entire war, like Albert D. J. Cashier. These two women are the best known and most fully documented of all the women combatants.”

General Ulysses S Grant :

 “Wherever the enemy goes, let our troops go also.”

Remember

The Battle of Chickamauga    35,000 Casualties 

September 18-20, 1863

“After the Tullahoma Campaign, Rosecrans renewed his offensive, aiming to force the Confederates out of Chattanooga. The three army corps comprising Rosecrans’ s army split and set out for Chattanooga by separate routes. In early September, Rosecrans consolidated his forces scattered in Tennessee and Georgia and forced Bragg’s army out of Chattanooga, heading south.”

Albert Pike :

“What we have done for ourselves alone dies with us; what we have done for others and the world remains and is immortal”

Remember

26th Colored US Pennsylvania

Giuseppe Garibaldi :

“I offer neither pay, nor quarters, nor food; I offer only hunger, thirst, forced marches, battles and death. Let him who loves his country with his heart, and not merely with his lips, follow me.”

Remember

                                     

The Spanish-American War

John “Black Jack” Pershing :

“The deadliest weapon in the world is a Marine and his rifle!”

Remember

The Argonne World War I

General George S Patton :

 “Always do everything you ask of those you command.”

Remember

D Day , Omaha Beach

General Robert E Lee

  “What a cruel thing is war:  to separate and destroy families and friends, and mar the purest joys and happiness God has granted us in this world; to fill our hearts with hatred instead of love for our neighbors, and to devastate the fair face of this beautiful world.”

Remember

The Forgotten War , Korea

Plato :

  “Only the dead have seen the end of war. “

Remember

Viet Nam

Jeane J. Kirkpatrick :

 “We have war when at least one of the parties to a conflict wants something more than it wants peace.”  

Remember

Urgent-fury-grenada-500-9

Operation : Urgent Fury

Jonathan Swift :

  “War! that mad game the world so loves to play. ” 

Remember

Operation Just Cause : Panama

 General William Westmoreland :

             ” War is fear cloaked in courage.”

Remember

Beirut October 23 , 1983

Dwight D. Eisenhower :

   “We are going to have peace even if we have to fight for it.”

Remember

The Gulf War : Operation Desert Storm

 Herbert V. Prochnow :

  “A visitor from Mars could easily pick out the civilized nations.  They have the best implements of war.”

Remember

Sergeant First Class Randall D. Shughart
Citation Reads: Rank and organization: Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army. Place and date: 3 October 1993, Mogadishu, Somalia. Entered service at: —– Born: Newville, Pennsylvania. Citation: Sergeant First Class Shughart, United States Army, distinguished himself by actions above and beyond the call of duty on 3 October 1993, while serving as a Sniper Team Member, United States Army Special Operations Command with Task Force Ranger in Mogadishu, Somalia. Sergeant First Class Shughart provided precision sniper fires from the lead helicopter during an assault on a building and at two helicopter crash sites, while subjected to intense automatic weapons and rocket propelled grenade fires. While providing critical suppressive fires at the second crash site, Sergeant First Class Shughart and his team leader learned that ground forces were not immediately available to secure the site. Sergeant First Class Shughart and his team leader unhesitatingly volunteered to be inserted to protect the four critically wounded personnel, despite being well aware of the growing number of enemy personnel closing in on the site. After their third request to be inserted, Sergeant First Class Shughart and his team leader received permission to perform this volunteer mission. When debris and enemy ground fires at the site caused them to abort the first attempt, Sergeant First Class Shughart and his team leader were inserted one hundred meters south of the crash site. Equipped with only his sniper rifle and a pistol, Sergeant First Class Shughart and his team leader, while under intense small arms fire from the enemy, fought their way through a dense maze of shanties and shacks to reach the critically injured crew members. Sergeant First Class Shughart pulled the pilot and the other crew members from the aircraft, establishing a perimeter which placed him and his fellow sniper in the most vulnerable position. Sergeant First Class Shughart used his long range rifle and side arm to kill an undetermined number of attackers while traveling the perimeter, protecting the downed crew. Sergeant First Class Shughart continued his protective fire until he depleted his ammunition and was fatally wounded. His actions saved the pilot’s life. Sergeant First Class Shughart’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest standards of military service and reflect great credit upon him, his unit and the United States Army.
Master Sergeant Gary I. Gordon
Citation Reads: Rank and organization: Master Sergeant, U.S. Army. Place and date: 3 October 1993, Mogadishu, Somalia. Entered service at: —– Born: Lincoln, Maine. Citation: Master Sergeant Gordon, United States Army, distinguished himself by actions above and beyond the call of duty on 3 October 1993, while serving as Sniper Team Leader, United States Army Special Operations Command with Task Force Ranger in Mogadishu, Somalia. Master Sergeant Gordon’s sniper team provided precision fires from the lead helicopter during an assault and at two helicopter crash sites, while subjected to intense automatic weapons and rocket propelled grenade fires. When Master Sergeant Gordon learned that ground forces were not immediately available to secure the second crash site, he and another sniper unhesitatingly volunteered to be inserted to protect the four critically wounded personnel, despite being well aware of the growing number of enemy personnel closing in on the site. After his third request to be inserted, Master Sergeant Gordon received permission to perform his volunteer mission. When debris and enemy ground fires at the site caused them to abort the first attempt, Master Sergeant Gordon was inserted one hundred meters south of the crash site. Equipped with only his sniper rifle and a pistol, Master Sergeant Gordon and his fellow sniper, while under intense small arms fire from the enemy, fought their way through a dense maze of shanties and shacks to reach the critically injured crew members. Master Sergeant Gordon immediately pulled the pilot and the other crew members from the aircraft, establishing a perimeter which placed him and his fellow sniper in the most vulnerable position. Master Sergeant Gordon used his long range rifle and side arm to kill an undetermined number of attackers until he depleted his ammunition. Master Sergeant Gordon then went back to the wreckage, recovering some of the crew’s weapons and ammunition. Despite the fact that he was critically low on ammunition, he provided some of it to the dazed pilot and then radioed for help. Master Sergeant Gordon continued to travel the perimeter, protecting the downed crew. After his team member was fatally wounded and his own rifle ammunition exhausted, Master Sergeant Gordon returned to the wreckage, recovering a rifle with the last five rounds of ammunition and gave it to the pilot with the words, “good luck.” Then, armed only with his pistol, Master Sergeant Gordon continued to fight until he was fatally wounded. His actions saved the pilot’s life. Master Sergeant Gordon’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest standards of military service and reflect great credit upon, his unit and the United States Army.

Mogadishu , Somalia October 1993

Thomas Jefferson :

  “I recoil with horror at the ferociousness of man.  Will nations never devise a more rational umpire of differences than force?  Are there no means of coercing injustice more gratifying to our nature than a waste of the blood of thousands and of the labor of millions of our fellow creatures?”

Remember

Bosnian Genocide

Dick Motta :

  “War is the only game in which it doesn’t pay to have the home-court advantage.” 

Remember

special forces on horseback

Afganistan

José Narosky :

  “In war, there are no unwounded soldiers.”

Remember

Invasion of Iraq

Henry Fosdick :

  “The tragedy of war is that it uses man’s best to do man’s worst.”  

Remember

All of the terrorist attacks over the past 30 odd years

Remember All Who Were Lost 

  They Were Lost For Us 

    PS: For those of you who have an interest in a conflict I left out please check out this timeline of US Wars created by the Smithsonian Institute . God Bless and please REMEMBER .

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