Tag Archive: WWII


USS Arizona’s Oldest Survivor Dies At 100

 

Joe Langdel was born in 1914, the same year work started

 

 

” Joe Langdell was working as a junior accountant in Boston when he got the idea that he should join the Navy and go to sea. It was 1940 and America edged closer every day to joining the war that raged in Europe.

  After proving his sea legs on the battleship New York, Langdell signed up. His college degree earned him a place in an officers’ training program. In March 1941, newly commissioned as an ensign, he reported for his first assignment: The USS Arizona, stationed at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii.

  By the end of the year, the mighty Arizona lay shattered beneath the harbor, sunk by Japanese bombers in the Dec. 7 attack that finally propelled the United States into World War II.

  Langdell survived the attack at Pearl Harbor, along with 334 other Arizona crewmen, and devoted much of his later years to preserving the memory of a day that changed history.

” The lesson I’ve learned from that experience is that the 1,177 men entombed on the ship right now will never know the love of a wife or the joy of grandchildren,” he said in 2006, when his son, Ted, interviewed him on video at Pearl Harbor. “We all have to remember that they did not die in vain.”

  Langdell died early Wednesday in a skilled nursing center in Yuba City, Calif. He was 100, the oldest living survivor of the Arizona. With his passing, just eight crewmen from the mighty battleship remain.”

 

Read more

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wreck Of Nazi U-Boat 576, US Freighter Found Off Coast

 

 

 

 

 

” The wreck of a Nazi submarine sunk during World War II has been found off the coast of North Carolina, maritime authorities announced Tuesday.

  U-boat 576 was found just 240 yards from another wreck: the American freight ship, Bluefields, which it torpedoed in the Battle of the Atlantic in 1942.

  The twin wrecks were found just 30 miles off the North Carolina coast, the National Oceanic and Atmosphere Administration said.

” Most people associate the Battle of the Atlantic with the cold, icy waters of the North Atlantic,” said David Alberg at the NOAA. “But few people realize how close the war actually came to America’s shores.” “

 

 

“… how close the war actually came to American shores.” is an understatement as the fact is German spies were actually put ashore on the beach in sleepy Amagansett , New York from a sister U-Boat on the night of June 12/13 1942 …

 

 

” Shortly after midnight on June 13th, four trained German saboteurs landed on the beach near the Coast Guard Station at Amagansett, Long Island. They had made the voyage across the Atlantic in a German submarine and had rowed ashore in a collapsible rubber boat containing clothing, explosives, and several thousand dollars in cash. On June 17th, four other saboteurs were similarly landed from a submarine at Ponte Vedra Beach, south of Jacksonville, Florida. On June 27th, J. Edgar Hoover announced the arrest of all eight saboteurs and the discovery of maps and plans for a two year program designed to destroy war plants, railways, water works and bridges in the United States.”

 

 

   Read more about the infiltration in Jacksonville four days later , as well as the landing in Maine in November of 1944 . The report on NOAA’s location of U-576 and the merchant ship Bluefields continues here .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This Traffic Jam Was Stuck In Belgian Forest For 70 Years

 

 

chatillon-car-graveyard-abandoned-cars-cemetery-belgium-10

Image credits: Theo van Vliet

 

 

 

” These spooky apocalyptic images are not a scene from “Walking Dead”, they were actually taken at one of the biggest car cemeteries in the world – the Chatillion Car Graveyard, Belgium.

  According to an urban legend these cars were left behind by US soldiers from World War II, who could not ship them back to the US so they decided to hide them in a forest until they could come back and retrieve them. The locals disagree and say that it’s simply an old car dump of vehicles made after the WWII.

  At one point there were four car graveyards in Chatillon with as many as 500 retro vehicles. Unfortunately, most of the cars were stolen or removed by the locals and due to environmental issues the whole graveyards was cleared in 2010.”

 

Lots more photos at Bored Panda

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last Of Original Group Of Navajo Code Talkers Dies

 

 

Chester Nez

Click Picture For Video

 

 

 

” Marine veteran Michael Smith wept Wednesday when he heard about the death of Chester Nez, the last of the original Navajo Code Talkers.

  Smith, from Window Rock, who had met Nez several times, described him as a “quiet, humble” Navajo Marine.”

 

 

 

 

” Smith said that the passing of Nez — the last of the first 29 Navajo men who created a code from their language that stumped the Japanese in World War II — marked the closure of a chapter in the story of a special group of veterans.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” Nez died Wednesday morning in Albuquerque, where he lived with his son Michael. He was 93. His family said he died of kidney failure.”

 

AZ Central has more

 

 

 

 

 

June 6th 1944

 

 

 

 

” In Dennis Sullivan’s photograph above, a landing craft from HMCS Prince Henry carries Canadian troops toward Juno Beach in the early hours of D-Day. Many years ago, I spoke to someone who’d been aboard the Prince Henry’s sister ship, HMCS Prince David, who talked about the subtly different dynamic among the guys on those landing craft. The Royal Canadian Navy men at the front are concerned to make their rendezvous on time: They’re in the middle of the mission, and they want to complete it. The infantrymen behind them are waiting for theirs to start. As the Prince Henry recedes behind them, they know they’re leaving the best-laid plans, and that what awaits them on shore is about to go agley.

  A lot went wrong, but more went right – or was made right. A few hours before the Canadians aboard the Prince Henry climbed into that landing craft, 181 men in six Horsa gliders took off from RAF Tarrant Rushton in Dorset to take two bridges over the river Orne and hold them until reinforcements arrived. Their job was to prevent the Germans using the bridges to attack troops landing on Sword Beach. At lunchtime, Lord Lovat and his commandos arrived at the Bénouville Bridge, much to the relief of the 7th Parachute Battalion’s commanding officer, Major Pine-Coffin. That was his real name, and an amusing one back in Blighty: simple pine coffins are what soldiers get buried in. It wasn’t quite so funny in Normandy, where a lot of pine coffins would be needed by the end of the day. Lord Lovat, Chief of the Clan Fraser, apologized to Pine-Coffin for missing the rendezvous time: “Sorry, I’m a few minutes late,” he said, after a bloody firefight to take Sword Beach.

  Lovat had asked his personal piper, Bill Millin, to pipe his men ashore. Private Millin pointed out that this would be in breach of War Office regulations. “That’s the English War Office, Bill,” said Lovat. “We’re Scotsmen.” And so Millin strolled up and down the sand amid the gunfire playing “Hieland Laddie” and “The Road To The Isles” and other highland favorites. The Germans are not big bagpipe fans and I doubt it added to their enjoyment of the day.”

 

Mr Steyn continues

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

National Geographic’s Profile Of The Dogs Of War

 

Picture of Marine Corporal John Dolezal posing with Cchaz, a Belgian Malinois

 

 

 

” Not all military dogs are suited to combat. Some wither in the heat or become too excited by the sounds of gunfire or explosions, even after they’ve been desensitized to them in training. Some are too loyal, too lazy, or too playful. Each dog is its own particular, sometimes peculiar, universe. Still, certain breeds generally do better than others on the battlefield, such as German shepherds, Labrador retrievers, and especially the Belgian Malinois, which is known for being fearless, driven, and able to handle the heat.

  But what works in a given environment may not work in another. History suggests that each battle situation calls for its own breed and tactics. Benjamin Franklin encouraged the use of dogs against the Indians. They “will confound the enemy a good deal,” he wrote, “and be very serviceable. This was the Spanish method of guarding their marches.” (Spanish conquistadores were said to have used bullmastiffs against Native Americans.)”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” During the Second Seminole War, starting in 1835, the U.S. military used Cuban-bred bloodhounds to track Indians in the swamps of Florida. Dogs were said to have guarded soldiers in the Civil War. During World War I both sides used tens of thousands of dogs as messengers. In World War II the U.S. Marines deployed dogs on Pacific islands to sniff out Japanese positions. In Vietnam an estimated 4,000 canines were used to lead jungle patrols, saving numerous lives. (Nevertheless, the military decided to leave many behind when the U.S. pulled out.)”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read the whole story at National Geographic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spitfire Gun Camera – Combat Footage – Battle Of Britain

 

 

 

THEY CALLED THEM SPITFIRES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fantastic Photos From Berlin And Hitler’s Bunker

 

 

 

 

Hitler's Bunker

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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 Only 7 World War II Medal of Honor Recipients Remain

 

 

 

 

” Walter Ehlers belonged to the “Greatest Generation” — men like my dad who left the warmth of homes to fight the tyranny of Naziism, fascism and imperialism. They are the men for whom our eyes well up when we meet them and hear their stories.

  Today unfortunately we bid farewell to a piece of American history: World War II Medal of Honor recipient, Walter D. Ehlers.

  When Ehlers was 23 years old, he charged through enemy fire to destroy two German machine gun nests, killed seven enemy soldiers, put a halt to a mortar barrage and carried a wounded buddy to safety – all after he had been shot in the side by a sniper. The date was June 9, 1944 at Normandy. His mission was to liberate Europe from the grip of Nazi Germany.”

 

 

From the Congressional Medal Of Honor Society

 

 

EHLERS, WALTER D.

Rank: Staff Sergeant
Organization: U.S. Army
Company:
Division: 18th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division
Born: May 7, 1921, Junction City, Kans.
Departed: Yes (02/20/2014)
Entered Service At: Manhattan, Kans.
G.O. Number: 91
Date of Issue: 12/19/1944
Accredited To: Kansas
Place / Date: Near Goville, France, 9-10 June 1944

 

EHLERS, WALTER D. Photo

 

 

 

S/Sgt Ehlers’ citation reads:

 

” For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty on 9-10 June 1944, near Goville, France. S/Sgt. Ehlers, always acting as the spearhead of the attack, repeatedly led his men against heavily defended enemy strong points exposing himself to deadly hostile fire whenever the situation required heroic and courageous leadership.

  Without waiting for an order, S/Sgt. Ehlers, far ahead of his men, led his squad against a strongly defended enemy strong point, personally killing 4 of an enemy patrol who attacked him en route. Then crawling forward under withering machinegun fire, he pounced upon the guncrew and put it out of action. Turning his attention to 2 mortars protected by the crossfire of 2 machineguns, S/Sgt. Ehlers led his men through this hail of bullets to kill or put to flight the enemy of the mortar section, killing 3 men himself. After mopping up the mortar positions, he again advanced on a machinegun, his progress effectively covered by his squad. When he was almost on top of the gun he leaped to his feet and, although greatly outnumbered, he knocked out the position single-handed.

  The next day, having advanced deep into enemy territory, the platoon of which S/Sgt. Ehlers was a member, finding itself in an untenable position as the enemy brought increased mortar, machinegun, and small arms fire to bear on it, was ordered to withdraw. S/Sgt. Ehlers, after his squad had covered the withdrawal of the remainder of the platoon, stood up and by continuous fire at the semicircle of enemy placements, diverted the bulk of the heavy hostile fire on himself, thus permitting the members of his own squad to withdraw.

   At this point, though wounded himself, he carried his wounded automatic rifleman to safety and then returned fearlessly over the shell-swept field to retrieve the automatic rifle which he was unable to carry previously. After having his wound treated, he refused to be evacuated, and returned to lead his squad. The intrepid leadership, indomitable courage, and fearless aggressiveness displayed by S/Sgt. Ehlers in the face of overwhelming enemy forces serve as an inspiration to others.”

 

 

For more information on this great and humble warrior go here , here , here and here .

 

 

Godspeed S/Sgt Ehlers … Rest in peace and thank you for your service.

 

 

Col. West has more

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unedited Footage Of The Bombing Of Nagasaki (Silent)

 

 

 

 

 

Published on Feb 6, 2014

” This silent film shows the final preparation and loading of the “Fat Man” bomb into “Bockscar,” the plane which dropped the bomb on Nagasaki. It then shows the Nagasaki explosion from the window of an observation plane. This footage comes from Los Alamos National Laboratory. I have not edited it in any way from what they gave me except to improve the contrast a little — it is basically “raw.” I have annotated it with some notes on the bombing and what you can see — feel free to disable the annotations if you don’t want them.

More details here, on my blog:http://blog.nuclearsecrecy.com/2014/0… “

 

HT/Libertarian Republic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

‘The Wind Rises’: The Beauty And Controversy Of Miyazaki’s Final Film

 

 

 

 

 

 

” Hayao Miyazaki’s The Wind Rises is a lot of things. It’s the final feature-length film from one of the all-time greats of Japanese animation. It’s a gorgeous, Oscar-nominated work that brings prewar Japan to life in ways that have never been seen before. It’s Miyazaki’s most pointedly adult movie, with a slow-burning tragedy replacing the magical realism and cute characters that have made Studio Ghibli’s films appeal across generations. And it’s the most controversial animated movie in recent memory.

  That’s because The Wind Rises is a sympathetic biography of a man whose work contributed to Japan’s brutal campaign of imperialist aggression during World War II. Jiro Horikoshi designed the Mitsubishi A6M Zero fighter plane that Japan used in Pearl Harbor and countless other assaults; the Zero was feared for the unparalleled range and maneuverability bestowed by Horikoshi’s considerable engineering skills. Although its subject matter is linked to a violent past, The Wind Rises follows in the tradition of Japanese works that eulogize artisanal passion and dedication to one’s craft — it could almost have been called Jiro Dreams of Fighter Planes. “

 

 

    Whatever you think of the controversy surrounding the subject matter of Miyazaki’s latest film , if you are a fan of his work as we are you are sure to want to see the Master’s “final” film . Everyone who is familiar with his work must have a favorite and goodness knows that all of his films are visually stunning regardless of the storytelling .
    For the uninitiated we offer a primer video below containing the trailers for the following Miyazaki screen gems: Spirited Away, Ponyo , Howl’s Moving Castle , My Neighbour Totoro , Laputa Castle In The Sky , Nausicaä of The Valley of The Wind , Kiki’s Delivery Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Left out of the collection above is our favorite Miyazaki creation of all … Porco Rosso , so we present you with a trailer (in Japanese) about Porco and his adventures .

 

 

      If you are under the impression that animated films are just for the young then you’ve never experienced the wonder and awe provoked with the artist’s brush and brought to the screen by Hayao Miyazaki and you owe it to yourself to give him a viewing . You will not be disappointed . Learn more about Miyazaki and Studio Ghibli here .

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Best (And Worst) War Movies Of All Time

 

” War movies have been around as long as cinema has existed. There is something about the horror, bravery, tragedy, and excitement of combat that has inspires filmmakers and put butts in the seats. By our thinking, a good war movie says something specific to the conflict it purports to represent. Historical accuracy is also a plus, but it’s easy to forgive some errors in the face of a good plot or overall effectiveness of a film. We limited our list to conflicts in which the U.S. fought, and we skipped a few, such as Kosovo or Grenada, that didn’t inspire many films. Of course, let us know what movies we’re missing.”

 

 

Worst Korean War Movie: MASH (1970)

” There are not many movies about the Korean War. So it’s annoying that perhaps the most famous one doesn’t actually focus on the conflict. MASH riffs on Vietnam while setting the battlefield hospital in Korea. The helicopter, introduced in Korea as a way to get casualties to hospitals, became an icon of the Vietnam War. The tales of cynical, world-weary doctors who misbehave, save lives, and gripe about the folly of war were comments on the war of the time, not the Korean conflict. The movie is much better than the TV show, though, and has an intriguing mix of comedy and bloody surgery. But these positives do not make MASH a great war movie or even a great antiwar movie. Its attitude and willingness to shock the establishment feel stuck in its time.”
See the best & worst movies of all US conflicts here … See how their choices stack up against yours 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alfred Hitchcock’s Unseen Holocaust Documentary To Be Screened

 

 

 

 

 

” The British Army Film Unit cameramen who shot the liberation of Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in 1945 used to joke about the reaction of Alfred Hitchcock to the horrific footage they filmed. When Hitchcock first saw the footage, the legendary British director was reportedly so traumatized that he stayed away from Pinewood Studios for a week.Hitchcock may have been the king of horror movies but he was utterly appalled by “the real thing”.

  In 1945, Hitchcock had been enlisted by his friend and patron Sidney Bernstein to help with a documentary on German wartime atrocities, based on the footage of the camps shot by British and Soviet film units. In the event, that documentary was never seen.

  Now, finally, the film is set to be seen in a version that Hitchcock, Bernstein and the other collaborators intended. The Imperial War Museum has painstakingly restored it using digital technology and has pieced together the extra material from the missing sixth reel. A new documentary, Night Will Fall, is also being made with André Singer, executive producer of The Act of Killing, as director and Stephen Frears as directorial advisor. Both the original film about the camps and the new documentary will be shown on British TV in early 2015 to mark the 70th anniversary of the “liberation” of Europe. Before that, next year, they are due to be shown together at festivals and in cinemas.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Nazi Women Who Were Every Bit As Evil As The Men

 

 

” In a book she tellingly calls ‘Hitler’s Furies’, Holocaust historian Professor Wendy Lower has unearthed the complicity of tens of thousands of German women — many more than previously imagined — in the sort of mass, monstrous, murderous activities that we would like to think the so-called gentler sex were incapable of.

  The Holocaust has generally been seen as a crime perpetrated by men. The vast majority of those accused at Nuremberg and other war crimes trials were men.

  The few women ever called to account were notorious concentration camp guards — the likes of Irma Grese and Ilse Koch — whose evil was so extreme they could be explained away as freaks and beasts, not really ‘women’ at all.

  Ultra-macho Nazi Germany was a man’s world. The vast majority of women had, on Hitler’s orders, confined their activities to Kinder, Küche, Kirche — children, kitchen and church. Thus, when it came to responsibility for the Holocaust and other evils of the Third Reich, they were off the hook.

  But that, argues Lower, is simplistic nonsense. Women were drawn into the morally bankrupt conspiracy that was Hitler’s Germany as thoroughly as men were — at a lower level, in most cases, when it came to direct action but guilty just the same.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pearl Harbor Mega Gallery

 

 

Pearl Harbor as viewed from space.

Image Credit: NASA
 
 

” Pearl Harbor as viewed from space.”

 

 

 

An aerial view of the U.S. Naval Operating Base, Pearl ...

Image Credit: USN

 

” An aerial view of the U.S. Naval Operating Base, Pearl Harbor, Oahu, looking southwest on 30 October 1941. Ford Island Naval Air Station is in the center, with the Pearl Harbor Navy Yard just beyond it, across the channel.”

 

 

 

 

See them all at Military.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Obama Administration Erects Needless Barricades To Open-Air WWII Memorial, and House Democrats Kill Funding For Veterans Administration

House Vote Count Veterans Admin

” You probably know how the Obama administration erected barricades at the WWII memorial but a group of WWII veterans burst through the barricades anyway.

The barricades were political theater.

Ace has the story, Obama Adminstration Specifically Denied Exception to Permit Veterans to Attend WWII Memorial:

Before we go any further, let us note once again how contrived it is to shut down entryways to a wide open space out in the middle of a park.

This is not a building, like a museum, that has doors and staffers and guides. This is fucking scenery.

And yet the erected artificial barriers to block people from walking through outdoor scenery.

Voila! Now we can pretend a memorial standing unsupervised out in the open is a “National Park” or “Open Air Museum” and close it to pedestrian traffic (and people can in fact just walk through this thing in their normal transversing of the city).

Now, that out of the way: They then took the next step.

When they were informed that the Honor Flight was on the way, and that they should make one exception for the veterans of WWII and open up the artificial barriers they had erected to make a political point, they refused.

The Daily Caller has further details on how the WWII Vets were ambushed by the Obama administration, Obama admin. knew about WWII veterans’ request and rejected it:”

Read More

America in a whole new light: Rare color photographs of the Great Depression and World War II show the hardships of life

image

” These vivid photos from the Great Depression and World War II capture an era in America generally seen only in black-and-white and bring it to life in full color.

  These rare pictures document the stories of those people in small towns and rural areas who were still poverty-stricken, as well as the lives of workers in inner city factories and workshops.”

image

  ” The images were taken by photographers for the United States Farm Security Administration and the Office of War Information and the collection of photographs from this time makes up a valuable record of the country and its people during the tough years between 1935 and 1944.”

Lot’s more at the link

Daily Video 6.21.13

WWII GUADALCANAL 1 of 3 RARE COLOR FILM

 

D-Day Daily Videos 6.6.13

 

 

 

 

1944 D-day in Color! New Outstanding Footage 1 of 3

1944 D-day in Color! New Outstanding Footage 2 of 3

1944 D-day in Color! New Outstanding Footage 3 of 3

 

 

 

 

D-Day 6/6/44

 

 

Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower 

 

 

”  I’m not sending a bunch of fresh young kids to die for a people they no nothing about, I’m asking them to die for freedom and they’re ready to do it and that’s why they’re heroes.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Richardson’s Philippine Guerrilla Gun: A Gun To Get A Gun

 

 

 

 

” Americans have long been a fan of shotgunspumpssemi-autos, over and unders, you name it, we love em. One red-blooded American even ran into an interesting one while doing a little Wolverines-style combat in the Philippines and thought it would catch on back home once the smoke cleared. His name was Richardson, and his idea is best known as the Philippine Guerrilla Gun.

 

Who was Richardson?

 

Iliff D. “Rich” Richardson was born the son of a Methodist minister in 1918. He learned basic survival skills as part of Boy Scout Troop 92 in Los Angeles, and attended Compton Junior College in the 1930s before joining the Navy in 1940. Stationed in the Philippines when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, Rich was assigned to PT-34, an ‘expendable’ 77-foot plywood motor torpedo boat. After the craft was sunk in April 1942 by Japanese aircraft, Rich and the remaining crew went ashore and fought first with the US Army then later with Philippine guerrillas once the main US force at Corregidor surrendered.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liberty Preservation: The States Say ‘NO’ To NDAA

 

 

 

“Just days ago, an anniversary passed which should never be forgotten. On April 1, 1942, an order was issued by Lt. General J.L. DeWitt which began the forced evacuation and “internment” of people of Japanese descent.

In the following three years, over 100,000 people, including US citizens, were “indefinitely detained” based solely on their racial (Japanese) background. This supposedly made them a threat to national security. Thousands of people of German and Italian descent got the same treatment.

Many lost everything. A few years later, when the federal government offered to pay claims for lost property, the average payout was a paltry $1392.

Much has been written about the horrors of internment during those years, so let’s not belabor the point. But today, when the federal government assumes some new power, those who point out how that power could very-well be abused in fantastic ways are often told, “That won’t happen here!”

April 1st should be a reminder to all of us. It already did happen here.

Unfortunately, the federal government has granted itself similar “indefinite detention” powers today. But the People have an opportunity to learn from history, and do something about it.

In states around the country, legislation is being considered which would severely hamper or even fully block any attempt to arrest and detain people without due process. In Michigan, Montana, Texas and California, votes are coming up soon to move such bills forward.  

In December 2011, President Obama signed the 2012 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), which gave the federal government the power to “indefinitely detain” people, including US citizens. No due process. No access to lawyers. And those who are detained have no idea if they’ll ever be set free.

This is the same kind of power which resulted in mass internment 71 years ago. In 1942, FDR exercised the power via executive order. The ACLU notes that the NDAA codified indefinite military detention into law for the first time in American history.  “